WSO Nov 2 – We Expose ‘Faux Soleil’ Fake Sun Leading to Balloon Flight Revelation! _ 03_11_2016.

03-11-2016

 

Nibiru

WSO Nov 2 – We Expose ‘Faux Soleil’ Fake Sun Leading to Balloon Flight Revelation! _ 03_11_2016.

 

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Steve Olson –

WSO 2 novembre – Nous exposons Faux Sun Conduisant à Balloon Flight Revelation!

WSO Nov 2 – We Expose Fake Sun Leading to Balloon Flight Revelation!

Steve Olson 

Ajoutée le 2 nov. 2016

Today, we start off with a little review of some current anomalies with a deep dive into physics – if you dare. Then, because of what we have learned about the lensing and light system they have up there to cover the system – we were able to go back to Jul Balloon Footage and know what we are looking at.

LINK TO ENERGY DRAIN OCT: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6jN…

LINK TO NEW DESIGN SUN SIMULATOR:https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6jN…

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Steve Olson –

WSO 3 novembre – Flashback 11 juin High Altitude Balloon Flight 

WSO Nov 3 – Flashback Jun 11 High Altitude Balloon Flight

Steve Olson 

Ajoutée le 3 nov. 2016

Now that we are clear on the sun simulator/lensing system that the PTB have put up there in combination with chemicals sprayed by airplanes, we found that our balloon footage was WAY MORE RELEVANT than we first had thought! https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr…

Researchers – I am looking forward to your analysis!

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Sun energy drain – update – October 26th 2016 – a
physicist’s thoughts
On October 26th 2016, the Sun’s light emission did not completely cease but it was reduced
repeatedly during a time period of about 5.5 hours. During this time, vertical and horizontal
image cut-off lines were used to hide at least one object that must have come close to the
Sun’s surface and that is able to discharge the Sun. These cut-off lines seem to also have been
used to hide the fact that the Sun partially loses light emission, as a result of the proximity of
this object. Often, horizontal and vertical cut-offs were used at the same time and sometimes
with a diagonal cut-off that has not been seen before. That so many cut-offs were used, at the
same time, suggests that several objects came very close to the Sun and at least one of them
caused the Sun to partially lose light emission from its surface.
Figure 1. Images of the Sun, as provided by the SDO satellite and viewed at Helioviewer.org, in
450 nm (visible light) at 13:29, 13:30, 14:30, 15:30, 16:30, 17:30, 18:30 and 19:30 (UTC). The
images show that the Sun goes through periods of reduced light emission at or around 13:30,
15:30 and 16:30.
Figure 1 shows images of the Sun in 450 nm (visible light) between 13:29 and 19:30 (UTC). The
first image, at 13:29, is the same image as the 12:30 image, as the visible light images are only
updated once per hour, on the half hour. The second image is from 13:30 and it shows that by
that time, the Sun had lost part of its light emission on its right hand side. The next or third
image, from 14:30, shows that the Sun was, at that time, not experiencing a light emission loss.
The Sun’s light emission is again reduced at 15:30 (fourth image), this time from the bottom
left. The fifth image, in figure 1, from 16:30, also shows that the Sun’s light emission was again
reduced, this time, from the top right.
Figure 2 shows images of the Sun in 19.3 nm (ultraviolet) between 13:13 and 13:16. Notice that
3 cut-off lines suddenly appear at 13:16 (last image in figure 2). Both a horizontal and a vertical
line are used as well as a diagonal line.
Figure 2. Images of the Sun as provided by the SDO satellite, in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet)
wavelength at 13:13, 13:14, 13:15 and 13:16 (UTC), on October 26th 2016. Three types of
image cut-offs are introduced at 13:16 (UTC).
Figure 3. Illustration of
portion of the Sun that is
not seen in the 13:16
image of October 26th
2016, due to the 3 cut-off
lines introduced.
Figure 4 shows images of the Sun in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet) wavelength between 13:23 and
13:44 (UTC), on October 26th 2016.
Figure 4. Images of the Sun, as provided by the SDO satellite, in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet)
wavelength, on October 26th 2016, at 13:16, 13:23, 13:30, 13:36, 13:38, 13:42, 13:43 and 13:44
(UTC).
The large coronal hole seen on the northern part of the Sun’s surface is in itself a sign that the
Sun is weak and an object is obviously draining it. However, this coronal hole also makes it
difficult to see if the Sun loses any more surface light emission during the time that the cut-off
lines are introduced. Now the images from 13:16 and 13:23 (first images in figure 4) are very
similar and there is no actual sign that any part of the Sun’s surface has lost light emission
because the areas we would need to examine have been cut off from view. However, we do
know from figure 1 that at 13:30, the right hand side of the Sun loses light emission, so the fact
that the top right of the Sun is now hidden suggests that there is an object, probably a star, in
the right hand corner of the Sun and that the same area has lost light emission, as a result of
the presence of this object. Figure 5 shows where the star that is discharging the surface of the
Sun and causing it to partially go dark is likely to be at 13:16 (UTC), on October 26th 2016.
Figure 5. Likely position of star,
probably a Brown Dwarf star,
hidden by image cut-off lines in
the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet)
wavelength SDO image at 13:16
(UTC) on October 26th Sun 2016. Portion of Sun
with light
emission loss
Star Star
At 13:30 (3rd image in figure 4), 2 of the cut-off lines are removed and only the vertical cut-off
line is left in place. We know from the visible light observations, shown in figure 1, that at this
time the light emission loss is on the right hand side of the Sun, so this is also where we expect
the Sun discharging object to be. This is shown in figure 6 below.
Figure 6. Likely position of
star causing the Sun’s light
emission loss on its right side
at 13:30 (UTC) on October
26th 2016.
At 13:36 (4th image in figure 4), a horizontal cut-off line appears at the bottom of the image,
and also a diagonal cut-off line. At the bottom of the diagonal cut-off line there is an uneven,
slightly rounded, edge, with darkness below it (indicated by a red arrow) suggesting that now
the Sun has lost some light emission, from this part of its surface. Subsequent images, at 13:36,
13:38 and 13:42 (5th to 7th images in figure 4) show that the dark part behind the rounded
uneven edge seems to grow slightly, indicating a slight increase in the Sun’s light emission loss.
Then, at 13:43, the bottom horizontal cut-off line is moved upwards and the diagonal cut-off
line is moved inwards across the surface of the Sun. At which time, a longer uneven edge with
darkness behind it, is visible. So, we can conclude that the Sun’s light emission loss increased
between 13:42 and 13:43. Notice as well that the surface of the Sun, above the diagonal line, is
darker than it seems to be in earlier images. This suggests a weakening in the light emission
from this area rather than a complete loss of light emission. Figure 7 shows the most likely
position of the star that is discharging part of the Sun between 13:36 and 13:44 (UTC). Notice
that if we take the overall movement of this star from figure 5 to figure 7, it looks like it is
following a circular path close to the Sun’s surface. In fact it looks like it is orbiting the Sun,
very close to the Sun’s surface and that it is moving in a clockwise direction.
Figure 7. Likely position of
star causing the Sun’s light
emission loss, on its bottom
right corner, between 13:36
and 13:44 (UTC) on October
26th 2016.
Sun
Portion of Sun
with light
emission loss
Star Star
Sun
Portion of Sun
with light
emission loss
Star
Figure 8. Images of the Sun, as detected by the SDO satellite, in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet)
wavelength, on October 26th 2016, at 13:52, 13:54 and 14:00 (UTC).
Figure 8 shows that the image at 13:52 is not much changed from the last image in figure 4, at
13:44, so the star draining the Sun’s surface charge must have stayed close to the Sun’s bottom
right hand corner, as illustrated in figure 7, until 13:52. But at 13:54, the bottom horizontal cutoff
line is lowered and the diagonal cut-off line is moved beyond the Sun’s edge so that only the
corona is cut-off. This suggests that the object effecting the Sun’s light emission has moved
away from the Sun’s surface and the emission has been restored. A possible reason for hiding
the corona may be that there is an object in the corona or that plasma discharges between the
Sun and the star, which is able to discharge it, are happening in the corona. At 14:00, only the
vertical cut-off line, on the right hand side of the Sun, is left. This means that that there may
still be an object to the right of the Sun.
Figure 9. Images of the Sun, as detected by the SDO satellite in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet)
wavelength, on October 26th 2016, at 14:06, 14:12, 14:18, 14:24, 14:25, 14:26, 14:29 and 14:30
(UTC).
Figure 9 shows images of the Sun in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet) wavelength between 14:06 and
14:30. The image at 14:30 shows the Sun’s whole surface with no light emission loss, in
agreement with the 450 nm observation for the same time, as shown in figure 1. However, in
figure 8 we see that a vertical cut-off line is used on the right hand side of the Sun at 14:00. In
figure 9, we see that at 14:06, a horizontal cut-off line at the top of the Sun and a diagonal cutof
line along the corona part of the Sun, at the top right hand corner are also used. At 14:12
(second image in figure 9), the vertical cut-off is in the same place but the top horizontal cut-off
line is further down and the diagonal line has also moved inwards, towards the centre of the
Sun. These lines are indicated by the red arrows.
At 14:18 (third image in figure 9), the vertical cut-off line is removed but the top horizontal cutoff
line remains. The top right, diagonal cut-off line is moved upwards, so that it covers only
part of the Sun’s corona. Also a new diagonal cut-off line appears on the top left and also
covers part of the Sun’s corona on that side. These cut-off lines are indicated by blue arrows.
This progressive change, starting on the right and proceeding upwards and to the left, in the
use of cut-off lines suggests that the object, or objects (up to 3, one behind each cut-off line),
or plasma discharges between the Sun and another object are moving anti-clockwise. This is
the opposite direction to the direction in which the object that drains the Sun’s surface charge
and causes light emission loss was moving between 13:16 and 13:52, so it is probably not the
same object. There is also no clear evidence that light emission loss on the Sun’s surface,
occurs during this time suggesting that whatever is being hidden here is not the star that
causes the Sun to go partially dark between 13:16 and 13:52.
Figure10. Images of the Sun, as detected by the SDO satellite, in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet)
wavelength, on October 26th 2016, at 14:36, 14:45, 14:49, 14:53 and 15:00 (UTC).
Figure 10 shows images of the Sun in 19.3 nm between 14:36 and 15:00 (UTC) on October 26th
2016. A bottom horizontal cut-off line is introduced in the first image, at 14:36, which is moved
upwards in the second image, at 14:45. In the third image, at 14:49, the diagonal cut-off line
appears. Two red arrows indicate the same area on the Sun, in the 14:49 image, and in the
previous image at 14:45. Notice that the area above the diagonal cut-off line in the 14:49 image
is clearly darker than the same area in the 14:45 image. This is an indication that the Sun’s
light emission has been weakened but since there is no actual evidence that any of the Sun’s
light emission has been lost, we cannot say for certain that the object causing this weakening is
the object in figures 5, 6 and 7. It could be the same object but a bit further away from the
surface of the Sun or another smaller Brown Dwarf star.
By 15:00 (UTC) only the vertical cut-of line on the Sun’s left hand side is being used which is an
indication that the star causing the Sun to go partially dark has moved to the Sun’s left hand
side.
Figure 11. Images of the Sun, as detected by the SDO satellite, in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet)
wavelength, on October 26th 2016, at 15:01, 15:06, 15:12, 15:15, 15:18, 15:24, 15:25, 15:30,
15:36, 15:42, 15:44 and 15:48 (UTC). Partial light emission loss occurs between 15:36 and
15:44 (UTC).
Figure 11 shows images of the Sun between 15:01 and 15:48 (UTC) on October 26th 2016. A
left vertical cut-of line appears at 15:01. A diagonal line and a horizontal cut-off line also appear
in the second image in figure 11 (indicated by red arrows). The use of these cut-off lines
suggest that one or two objects may be hiding behind them but there is no evidence that the
Sun experiences a loss of light emission, at this time. The first sign that a loss of light emission
is occurring is that the corona, in the bottom left hand corner, of the Sun is reduced in size
between the 15:25 and the 15:30 images (the last 2 images in the middle row of figure 11). This
is indicated by a blue arrow. Then, between 15:36 and 15:44 (first 3 images in bottom row of
figure 11), and so for a period of 8 minutes, we see that the diagonal cut-off is unevenly edged
(indicated by red arrows) and that there is darkness below it. Also, above the unevenly edged
line, the surface of the Sun looks darker (indicated by purple arrows) than it did in the images
before the appearance of the uneven edge. So we know that during this time, the Sun
experiences a partial loss of light emission, and that therefore, the object that is discharging the
Sun must be close to its surface.
The light emission loss, between 15:36 and 15:44, occurs in the lower left hand corner of the
Sun, agreeing with the observations in the 450 nm (visible light) wavelength showing that the
Sun loses light emission in this same corner, at 15:30. Figure 12 shows two images of the Sun,
one in 450 nm, from 15:30 (UTC), and another in 19.3 nm, from 15:42 (UTC). Notice that the
light emission loss, in the 450 nm image, is mostly on the left hand side of the Sun, whilst the
light emission loss in the 19.3 nm image is more in the bottom left hand corner of the Sun. This,
in turn, suggests that the Brown Dwarf star that is likely to be causing this loss in the Sun’s
ability to emit light is close to this corner but further up along the left side of the Sun at 15:30
and further down toward the corner by 15:42 (UTC). This is illustrated in figure 13.
Figure 12. Images of the Sun, as provided by the SDO satellite, on October 26th 2016. On the
left: image from 15:30 (UTC) in the 450 nm (visible light) wavelength. On the right: image from
15:42 (UTC) in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet) wavelength. The Sun loses light emission in the bottom
left hand corner in both images but the loss is more along the left side at 15:30 and more along
the left corner at 15:42.
Figure 13. Likely position
of star, probably a Brown
Dwarf star, causing the
Sun’s partial light emission
loss at 15:30 and 15:42
(UTC)
From figure 13, since the star, likely to be a Brown Dwarf star, is on the left of the Sun at 15:30
and moves to the bottom left corner of the Sun by 15:42, we conclude that it is moving
anticlockwise around the Sun. However, the Sun’s partial light emission loss between 13:16
Sun
Portion of Sun
with light
emission loss at
15:30
Star
Sun
Portion of Sun
with light
emission loss at
15:42
Star
and 13:52 (UTC) on October 26th, led to the conclusion that the star, causing the light emission
loss at that time, was moving in a clockwise direction. It is not likely that a star changes its
direction of motion in such an abrupt manner. Therefore the most reasonable way to reconcile
these seemingly mutually exclusive conclusions is that there are actually two stars, and
therefore a Brown Dwarf binary system that now and then make a loop around the Sun, one
orbits in a clockwise direction and the other in an anticlockwise direction.
Figure 14. Images of the Sun, as detected by the SDO satellite, in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet)
wavelength, on October 26th 2016, at 17:07, 17:08, 17:10, 17:17 and 17:18 (UTC). Between
17:08 and 17:17, there is a partial light emission loss from the Sun’s surface.
Figure 14 shows images of the Sun in the 19.3 nm wavelength on October 26th 2016, between
17:07 and 17:18. The uneven edge (indicated by red arrows) and black area behind the edge,
in the images from 17:08, 17:10 and 17:17 suggest that the Sun lost part of its surface light
emission for a period of 9 minutes. Another sign of the Sun’s partial loss in light emission is the
dark brown colouration above the diagonal edge (indicated by the red arrows). These dark
brown areas do not appear in the 17:07 (first image) or in the 17:18 (last image) images.
The last detected partial light emission loss of the day, started at 18:26 (UTC), on October 26th
2016. Figure 15, shows some of the observations pertaining to this light emission loss. The
partial light emission loss occurs between 18:26 and 18:35 (UTC), a period of 9 minutes. We
again see an uneven edge (indicated by the orange arrows) with darkness below the edge,
whilst above the edge we see a dark brown area that was not there in the 18:25 image.
Figure 15. Images of the Sun, as detected by the SDO satellite, in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet)
wavelength, on October 26th 2016, at 18:25, 18:26, 18:31, 18:35, 18:36, 18:43 and 18:50 (UTC).
Between 18:26 and 18:35, there is a partial light emission loss from the Sun’s surface.
Table 1: Time intervals, during which the Sun turned partially dark, in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet)
wavelength, as detected by the SDO satellite, on October 26th 2016. The last column indicates
the area on the Sun in which the light emission loss occurred.
Light emission loss
event
Time interval for
event (UTC)
Partial light emission
loss time (minutes)
Area of loss
1 13:36 to 13:44 8
Bottom right corner
2 15:15 to 15:25 10
Bottom left corner
3 17:08 to 17:17 9
Bottom left corner
4 18:26 to 18:35 9
Bottom right corner
Table 1 summarises the partial light emission loss observations for which we could see from the
images an uneven edge and darkness below it, in the 19.3 nm (ultraviolet) wavelength. The
450 nm (visible light) observations are not included in this table because it is not possible to
determine a period from the available images. However, if we try to match the 450 nm
observations, shown in figure 1, with the light emission loss summarised in Table 1, we see that
for the first event, visible light loss was observed first, at 15:30, whilst the ultraviolet light loss
was only detected at 15:36, 6 minutes later. In the second and third events, the visible light
loss is detected after the ultraviolet light loss. The fourth event, detected in 19.3 nm, does not
appear to have been detected in 450 nm. This however could be due to a failure to update the
visible light image or replacing it with an older one, at 18:30 (UTC).
In conclusion, on October 26th, the Sun goes through partial light emission losses that repeat
themselves, four times. A light emission loss requires that some object comes close enough to
the Sun’s surface and discharges it. The most likely object is a Brown Dwarf star that would be
at a lower electrical potential than the Sun. However, the evidence actually suggests that the
observed light emission losses are caused by 2 Brown Dwarfs making a loop around the Sun in
opposite directions. These would therefore be a part of a Brown Dwarf binary system.
The Sun experienced an even more dramatic light emission loss on October 19th, 7 days earlier,
which also happened 4 times over a period of about 5 hours. The fact that the light loss also
happened 4 times may be a hint that it was also caused by the Brown Dwarf binary system.
The reason why the light emission loss was not as dramatic on October 26th may be due to the
fact that the Sun’s and the Brown Dwarf’s electrical potentials became closer to each other
during the October 19th interaction. This would mean that the Sun’s potential was lowered and
the Brown Dwarf’s potential was increased, i.e. the Sun was drained of energy

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New Design Sun Simulator – a physicist’s thoughts
Now evidence reveals that a New Design Sun Simulator device is being used and viewed in
the sky above Earth. Figure 1, on the left, shows a film photograph, taken of the device, and
on the right, we see a lens flare of the same device. This is one of those instances where the
idea that lens flares can provide valuable information is validated. The device has a central
light source and is surrounded by several concentric rings.
Figure 1. On the right: a
film photograph of a
device appearing in our
skies. On the left: a lens
flare with the same
characteristics as the
device on the left, thus
suggesting that it is a Sun
simulation device.
The rings are probably due to the use of a Fresnel lens in front of the device. Figure 2 shows a
circular shaped glass Fresnel lens of the type used in lighthouses, and thought to also be used in
front of the Sun simulation device in figure 1.
Figure 2. A
circular glass
Fresnel lens of
the type used in
lighthouses. It
is made up of a
central circle
and concentric
rings like what
we see on the
New Design Sun
Simulator.
Figure 3. On the
left: a Fresnel
lens mounted in
front of a light
source such as
would be found
in a lighthouse.
On the right:
the front and
side views of a
circular Fresnel
lens.

Figure 3 shows how this type of lens is typically used in a lighthouse. Fresnel lenses make light
appear brighter by refracting the rays, diverging away from a light source, so that all the rays arrive
at the observer parallel to each other. This is illustrated in figure 4. Making all the rays parallel to
each other, makes the light appear brighter to an observer and also makes it seem as if the source of
light is at infinity. This is because rays from sources, such as the Sun, at infinity, i.e. very far away,
arrive on Earth parallel to each other.
Figure 4. Light rays
diverging from a light
source are refracted
by the different
curvatures on a
Fresnel lens, so that
all the rays emerge
parallel to each other.
Now, a Sun simulation device needs to simulate the light emitted by the Sun, which is extremely
intense or bright. One way to produce such a bright source of light, artificially, is to use
Sonoluminescence (SL) which uses sound waves, in a liquid, to produce a very bright light. The
process is shown in figure 5. Sound waves cause the appearance of a bubble inside a liquid. The
bubble fills up with gas and increases in size; then it collapses. But the collapse is very fast and
violent resulting in the ionization of the gas inside the bubble and very high temperatures of over
10 000 K (kelvin), i.e. hotter than the surface of the Sun. Thus, plasma is created in the bubble’s
core, as it collapse, and a very bright blue light is emitted, when the bubble reaches its minimum
size. The spectrum of the emitted light is similar to black body radiation, in the range, between
25 000 K and 50 000 K. Thus the emitted light is blue and violet. This means that it looks white in the
centre but bluish in the periphery. However, the addition of a magnetic field of up to 20 Tesla,
stabilises the SL bubbles even more and also expands the light emission spectrum, so that other
visible light frequencies (red and yellow) may also be emitted. The intensity of the light emitted is
sensitive to the temperature of the fluid, the bubble is allowed to form in. If the fluid used is water,
at a temperature of 10o
C, a more stable bubble is produced and a higher intensity light is emitted
than at a higher temperature of, for example, 20o C.

Figure 5. (a) Bubble
forms due to sound
waves being
transmitted through a
liquid in a transparent
chamber. (b) Bubble
expands. (c) Bubble
collapses. (d) A very
bright bluish light is
emitted.
It is possible to also produce a stable single-bubble SL, which results in a continuously pulsating very
bright light. In order to create such a stable effect, the gas available to fill the bubble has to be an
inert gas (helium, argon or xenon) and sound standing waves need to be produced in the fluid
chamber. These standing waves occur at certain frequencies that depend on the size of the
chamber. When a bubble is trapped in a standing wave, a pulse of light is emitted with each
compression of the bubble, within the standing wave, resulting in a very bright pulsating light. The
light is so bright that it looks like a star.
Sound waves, in a tube, are made up of alternate compression and rarefaction areas of molecules
within the tube, as shown in figure 6 below. Areas of compression are areas of high pressure and
areas of rarefaction are areas of low pressure. These areas of compression and rarefaction travel
through the tube at a constant speed, causing particles in the medium to oscillate around an
equilibrium position.
Figure 6. A sound wave in a tube
is made up of alternate areas of
compression and rarefaction in a
medium. The molecules are
closer together in areas of
compression, where pressure is
also high.
A standing wave, however, does not travel through the tube; it merely oscillates and causes particles
in the medium, at certain fixed position, called nodes, to not oscillate at all, and at other positions,
exactly between the nodes, and called antinodes, the particles in the medium experience a
maximum oscillation due to alternating compressions and rarefactions. The stable bubble must be
at one of these antinode positions. Thus, during the period of rarefaction, the bubble expands
dramatically, then, as the pressure increases and becomes compressive, the bubble collapses
violently. The collapsing wall of the bubble reaches supersonic speeds and produces a shock wave.
The shock wave hits the centre, rebounds back toward the bubble wall hitting the liquid – gas
interface, from where it originated. The gas inside the bubble is heated to a very high temperature
and the gas near the centre of the bubble is almost completely ionized, which means that a hot
plasma forms. The light emission is due to the plasma and produced by the deceleration of charged
particles interacting with other charged particles, so that the resulting radiation is called
bremsstrahlung radiation (deceleration radiation). Simulations suggest that a temperature of 100
million degrees kelvin is possible, at the centre of the bubble, during its collapse.

Figure 7. Nodes are points, in a
medium where a sound wave has
been established, of no movement
of molecules and anti-nodes are
points of maximum movement of
molecules due to alternating
compressions and rarefactions. A
bubble must be at an antinode
position in order for a stable SL to
be produced.
The addition of small amounts of inert gases (gases of very low reactivity) such as helium, argon or
xenon, to the liquid, causes the bubble that forms, to be filled with this inert gas, and the intensity of
the light emitted once the bubble collapses, is increased as well. Some experiments done with SL
have suggested that the temperatures produced inside the core of the bubble, as it collapses, is so
high that fusion reactions are possible, making the phenomenon even more star-like, as we now
have ionization, formation of a hot plasma, in the core of the bubble, and now, also the possibility of
fusion reactions.
The question is now, how would SL be used as a light source for a Sun Simulator? It is possible to
produce more than one bubble, in a single chamber, but the light produced is not as stable as when
one single bubble is produced. So, unless there has been technological innovation that we are not
aware of, it might be necessary to have many single chambers mounted on a disk. In order to take
advantage of the light emitted backwards, toward the mounting disk, it may be a good idea to have
concave reflectors, mounted on the disk, behind the chambers. This would be a similar arrangement
to that of the first Sun Simulator design, except that instead of arc lamps, chambers filled with a
liquid, would be used. Each chamber would also be connected to a sound wave generator and
possibly to coils that produce the desired magnetic field. Figure 8 shows this type of arrangement.
Figure 8. The New design
Sun simulator light source
arrangement is made up
mainly of a SL chamber and
a concave reflector behind
it. The cooling mechanism
is needed to keep the fluid
at the correct temperature
for a stable light emission.
The type of light that is needed would require that large numbers of SL chambers and concave
mirror reflectors, be mounted on a flat disk, as shown in figure 9 below. Then the SL chamber array
would be mounted in the centre of a back disk, and a Fresnel lens would be mounted in front, as
shown in figure 10. The SL light source would produce a pulsating light and may explain why the Sun
sometimes looks like it is pulsating.
Nodes – points of no
movement of molecules
Antinodes – points of
maximum movement of
molecules
SL chamber
Concave
reflector
SL
chamber
Cooling
mechanism
Light rays
from SL
chamber
are
projected
forward
Sound
wave
generator

Figure 9. Light source
array, at the back of
the New Design Sun
Simulator device, is
made up of SL
chambers and
hexagonal shaped
concave reflectors
mounted on a flat disk
Figure 10. Side view and
front view of the New Design
Sun simulator device. The SL
chambers and hexagonal
reflectors are mounted at
the back and a Fresnel lens is
mounted in front of the SL
chambers.
So, the New Design Sun Simulator now has a light source that is likely to produce a light that is bright
enough to simulate the Sun. What it still needs, though, is a good power source. A series of small
fusion reactors, capable of producing 50 times more power than they use in order to operate, are
now available, and would be an option. But another option is an Energy Collection device that is
able to collect energy directly from a plasma discharge, by acting as an electrode, at a low potential.
A design for that has already been considered and is shown in figure 11 below.
Figure 11. Energy collector able
to absorb energy directly from a
plasma discharge. The parabolic
reflector part collects the energy,
which is then transferred to the
collector, at the focal point of the
parabolic reflector.
Flat disk
SL chamber and
reflector mounted on
flat disk
Side view Front view
SL chambers
Fresnel lens Containment vessel and
back mounting disk
Energy absorber
Collector disk
Plasma discharge

Figure 12, on the left, shows an object with concentric circles, which are similar to what we see in
the New Design Sun Simulator, shown in figure 1. The device appears to be in close proximity to an
object, which seems to be made of gaseous churning granules, like we would expect to see on the
surface of a star, but there is also very low light emission, suggesting that it is a Brown Dwarf star. In
other words, a star, which has used up all of its fuel, and is left only with iron, which cannot be used
to produce energy through fusion.
On the right of figure 12, we see that a large plasma discharge appears between what is likely to be a
Brown dwarf and somewhere behind what seems to be the New Design Sun Simulator. This would
suggest that an Energy Collection device is mounted behind the light emission part of the New
Design Sun Simulator, which is able to directly harness energy from a plasma discharge.
Figure 12. On the left: Object with concentric rings (indicated by the red arrow) like the New Design
Sun Simulator is seen in close proximity to an object that appears to be a small Brown Dwarf star. On
the right: A large plasma discharge (indicated by the purple arrow), from the surface of the object
that appears to be a Brown Dwarf, toward the back of the New Design Sun Simulator, is a possible
indication that there is an Energy Collection device, mounted on the back of the Sun simulation
device, capable of harnessing energy directly from a plasma discharge.
This Brown Dwarf, in figure 12, does not have the same ionised iron cloud as the Brown Dwarf seen
in SECCHI images and is likely to be a lot smaller than that other Brown Dwarf. This may be an
indication that there may be several Brown Dwarf stars, associated to the Nemesis system, that have
now invaded the Solar System.

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